On the radix of ethics

O radix Jesse, qui stas in signum populorum, super quem continebunt reges os  suum, quem gentes deprecabuntur: veni ad liberandum nos, jam noli tardare.

Love flows from an unconditional affirmation of what is. A garden springs from soil that is fertile and ethics has its original ground in love. The Law is always downstream of its source, which is Love. All ethical precepts trace their origin to the moral regard between beings. A moral regard for another person follows from an unconditional affirmation of him. This is not an affirmation of what the other thinks, but that he thinks it. This does not have anything to do with condoning falsehoods or exulting righteousness; it is prior to both of these things. Instead, the moral posture is a recognition of the divine element of freedom in the other. Freedom means will that is conscious. This is the same will that, since the beginning, has created and sustained all being in the cosmos including what we recognise as the moral order, and which we continue to participate in.

One branch of a tree has differentiated itself from its neighbor but to begin with, they were one bough; both enfolded in an anterior unity. In the same way, the will which confronts me in opposition from my brother is the same will that I know as my very own, but in an alienated form. The will which established the mountain where it stands is the same which courses through my limbs. In both cases, I experience the freedom in one and must seek to discover it in the other. The first is the beginning of self-knowledge and the second is the consummation of self-knowledge in love.

As Jesus said: Think not that I came to destroy the law or the prophets: I came not to destroy, but to fulfil. (Matthew 5:17)

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

One Comment Add yours

  1. One branch of a tree has differentiated itself from its neighbor but to begin with, they were one bough; both enfolded in an anterior unity.

    “Maybe you are searching among the branches, for what only appears in the roots.” ~ Rumi

    So, how does this “anterior unity” translate into our consciousness of and as the natural world and her laws?

    The material world tells us that to be human is to be in dialogue with what is other: what is physically other, what is humanly other in the solid three-dimensionality of other persons, ultimately what is divinely other…. [T]his otherness is always communicating: meaning arises in this encounter, it is not devised by our ingenuity. — Embracing Our Limits, The Lessons of Laudato Si’

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s